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Am Lehrstuhl für Geoinformatik der Universität Heidelberg suchen wir derzeitmögl. kurzfristig eine wissenschaftliche Hilfskraft oder PraktikantIn für die Web-Frontend-Entwicklung im Rahmen des OpenRouteService (www.openrouteservice.org) Projekts.
Siehe Stellenbeschreibung im Anhang.
Bei Interesse bitte melden, gerne auch weiterleiten.

Du studierst Geographie, Informatik oder eine ähnlichen Studienrichtung und möchtest deine Kenntnisse in der Geoinformatik vertiefen?
Du hast schon mal clienseitig entwickelt und HTML, CSS und Javascript sind für dich keine Fremdwörter?
Dann haben wir für dich eine spannende…
Aufgabe:
Die Weiterentwicklung und Pflege des Clients des auf freien Geodaten basierenden Routenplaners OpenRouteService (ORS: http://openrouteservice.org/)
- Verbesserung der clientseitigen Logik und des aktuellen JavaScript Frameworks
- Debugging des neuen ORS Clients (https://koenigstuhl.geog.uni-heidelberg.de/ors/)

Voraussetzungen
- Erforderlich: GIS-Grundkenntnisse, HTML, CSS, Javascript
- Gewünscht: OpenLayers, HTML5
- Wäre schön: WebServices (z.B. OGC Services),Tomcat

Bewerbung mit kurzen Anschreiben und kurzem Lebenslauf an
Enrico Steiger (enrico.steiger@geog.uni-heidelberg.de).
Möglicher Vertragsbeginn: ab sofort

http://www.gogeo.ac.uk/img//logos/GISCience2014.png

Last week members of the GIScience Research Group were attending the Eight International Conference on Geographic Information Science in Vienna. Beside the interesting welcome note given by Andrew U. Frank and further follow-up keynote talks, the first conference day was opened up for full day workshops covering various topics of GIScience.

Geographic Information Workshop

In conjunction with the GIScience conference Andreas Reimer presented results from the SUCAP-Project at a workshop on cartography and generalization. Enrico Steiger was presenting a talk about his past research on geographic feature extraction from uncertain Twitter data which was followed by an opening discussion around the emerging topic of user generated content (UGC) and its future scientific impacts and challenges.

One of the subtasks of automated map labelling that has received little attention so far is the labelling of areas. Geographic areas often are represented by concave polygons which pose severe limitations on straightforward solutions due to their great variety of shape, a fact worsened by the lack of measures for quantifying feature-label relationships. In our recently published (online) paper, we introduce a novel and efficient algorithm for labelling area features externally, i.e. outside their polygonal boundary. Two main contributions are presented in the following. First, it is a highly optimized algorithm of generating candidate placements utilizing algorithms from the field of computational geometry. Second, we describe a measure for scoring label positions. Both solutions based on a series of well-established cartographic precepts about name positioning in the case of semantic enclaves such as islands or lakes. The results of our experiments show that our algorithm can efficiently place labels with a quality that is close to the quality of traditional cartographic products made by human cartographers.

If you really like well designed maps that are, in addition, labelled according to a rich set of cartographic principles, then you should certainly try out MapSurfer.NET framework. Remember that this framework was used for styling and rendering of amazingly beautiful maps that are available through our web map service OpenMapSurfer.

Reference

Rylov M.A., Reimer A.W. (2014) “A Practical Algorithm for the External Annotation of Area Features.” The Cartographic Journal. DOI: 10.1179/1743277414Y.0000000091.

Recently the new research project “Urban Emotions” has started. It is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) and aims at the development of a methodology to extract contextual emotional information for spatial planning based on real-time people-as-sensors and crowdsourcing approaches with social media.

The spatial and social structures of a city and its underlying processes can trigger different collective and individual human emotions as a person’s response to such urban contexts. However, the integration of such human urban emotions into citizen-centric spatial planning processes is a major challenge in order to contribute to a changing understanding of spatial and regional planning.

The goal of the Urban Emotions project is to analyse data from real-time human sensory and crowdsourcing approaches in social networks for the extraction of contextual emotion information for decision support in spatial planning. This methodology includes the correlation between emotions extracted from psycho-physiological smartband sensor measurements and different VGI and social media datasets.

Further Information

Urban Emotions

Heidelberg University

While this is a bit off-subject it might be interesting to know that Heidelberg University as a whole scored again very well in the latest international university rankings: According to both QS World University Ranking and Shanghai Ranking it is again the best university in Germany and increased it’s worldwide ranking to 49.

Heidelberg from Philosophers way

Heidelberg from Philosophers way

The Working Group of Geoinformatics of the German Society for Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Geoinformation (DGPF) is led by Prof. Jan-Hendrik Haunert from the University of Osnabrück. The working group deals with research questions related to Geo-Information Systems (GIS), such as the integration of GIS and image data, GIS analysis algorithms and geospatial data infrastructures.

Bernhard Höfle joins the working group as new co-chair.

On the 12th and 13th of August 2014, the Smart Simulation Group led by Dr. Mohamed Bakillah of the GIScience Research Group at Heidelberg University organized and hosted an internal workshop for the CAP4Access project partners. The aim of this workshop was to present and discuss the activities, sharing of tasks, ongoing progress and issues with the various partners. Among others, talks were given by Dr. Bakillah, Project Leader at Heidelberg University, about the development of the collaborative tagging and recommendation system; by Dr. Adam Roussel, about the routing and navigation services; and by Amin Mobasheri, about the geo-data quality evaluation service. In addition, representatives of center for social innovation (ZSI) partner, Dr. Christian Voigt, Susanne Dobner, and Patrick Berger presented their ideas and initial sketches about different user stories developed for their pilot test in Vienna.

The talks led to fruitful comments that will be considered to ensure the quality and relevance of the services being developed, as well as outcomes that provide future directions for the next steps. The participants of this workshop were from Heidelberg University, Center for Social Innovation (ZSI), Sozialhelden and Mapping4Change.

Outdoor group photo of workshop participants

Outdoor group photo of workshop participants

A new research paper titled “Understanding the potential relationship between the socio-economic variables and contributions to OpenStreetMap” has been published in the International Journal of Digital Earth.

Abstract: OpenStreetMap (OSM) has seen an exponential increase in the last few years and large volumes of geodata have been received from volunteered individuals. The collected geodata are heterogeneous in terms of different dimensions such as spatial patterns of contributions, quality, patterns of contributing individuals, and type of contributions. Because contributors’ personal information is anonymously stored by the OSM administrators, alternative methods are needed to investigate the role of contributors’ characteristics on their mapping behavior. This study is intended to explore the potential socio-economic characteristics of contributors in highly contributed areas to have better insights about the latent patterns of involved individuals in a highly dynamic state of the most active country in OSM, Germany. A logistic regression model (LRM) is applied to discover the potential correlations between dependent and independent variables. The findings explain that the areas with high population density, middle level of education, high income, high rate of overnight stays, high number of foreigners, and residents aged from certain age groups are more likely to be involved in OSM. Furthermore, the degree of dynamism in OSM is a function of proximity to built-up areas. Finally, concluding remarks concerning the independent variables and model sensitivity are presented.

Further reading: Jokar Arsanjani, J. and Bakillah, M. “Understanding the Potential Relationship between the Socio-Economic Variables and Contributions to OpenStreetMap.” International Journal of Digital Earth (pending). http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17538947.2014.951081

On tuesday morning a delegation from the ITC (Enschede, Netherlands) visited our GIScience research group in Heidelberg. The visiting group consisted of master students and Prof. Frank Ostermann, who was leading the excursion. Their aim was to get an impression of the multifaceted research that is going on in our group. Some members of our group presented their specific subareas, while providing a broad overview. Each talk was followed by a lively discussion among the students and the speakers. The visit was concluded by a joint lunch in the Mensa of Heidelberg University.

The visiting group from ITC and our speakers

The visiting group from ITC and our speakers

Andreas Reimer, presenting our cartographic research

Andreas Reimer, presenting our cartographic research

On 11th of September, the second experiment for the CAP4Access project for Heidelberg pilot city was performed by Smart Simulation group (led by Mohamed Bakillah) with collaboration of LIDAR research group of Heidelberg University. Bernhard Höfle, Amin Mobasheri and Evelyn Schmitz participated in this fieldwork, using RIEGL VZ-400 laser scanning device in order to collect 3D point clouds in the Heidelberg Altstadt area.

The places for data collection were selected based on the data and attribute requirements such as sidewalk geometries, vertical and horizontal slope, and height of sidewalks as well as surface texture type. The results of this experiment would be later used as a reference data with high accuracy for evaluating the quality of sidewalk information derived from GPS traces (for more information read the first experiment).

The experiment started at 06:00 a.m. and lasted for 5 hours. Almost 1 billion single highly precise 3D measurements were collected. Some minutes of raining caused difficulties, but the participants were quite happy with the efficiency of their work to cover the planned area plus some additional places, and enjoyed having fun with drinking warm coffee in the beautiful old-town of Heidelberg.

Group photo of fieldwork experiment participants

Group photo of fieldwork experiment participants

Setting up the device and getting prepared for data collection

Setting up the device and getting prepared for data collection

Collecting data in a horizontally and vertically sloped street with narrow-wide sidewalks and stoned surface texture

Collecting data in a horizontally and vertically sloped street with narrow-wide sidewalks and stoned surface texture

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