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Tag Archive 'become-ohsome'

It’s been a while, since  we have published the last blog post about the awesome ohsome platform, but don’t worry, there’s always something happening of course in the spatial analytics team of HeiGIT. So here we are, back on track with enlarging your imagination on what is possible when using our OpenStreetMap history [...]

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Besides dealing with a snake, making quality assessments, or generating comparable statistics, one needs to know how to handle the whole functionality provided by the ohsome API to really become ohsome. And to achieve exactly that, this blog presents the last missing entry point to the API from the current toolkit, namely the /users resource. With its help you can receive aggregated [...]

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Welcome back to a new episode of how to become ohsome. Yes, you’ve read the heading correctly. We are really talking about a snake in a notebook on another planet. If you are familiar with one of the most used programming languages in the GIS world, you might already know by now which snake is [...]

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This is your first blog of the ohsome series? Before you might be confronted with any potential spoilers, you should better check out the first and the second part of this blog series (or the intro to the idea and general architecture) to be on the safe side and up to date with the current content.
So here [...]

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Welcome back to the second part of the blog series how to become ohsome. If you have not read the first part yet, better go and check it out now. It explains how you can create an ohsome visualization of the historical development of the OSM data from a city of your choice.
This second part shows how to use [...]

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This blog post is the start of a series of posts, which describe what you are able to do using the ohsome framework developed at the Heidelberg Institute of Geoinformation Technology (HeiGIT). OpenStreetMap (OSM), the biggest open map of our world, offers not only the current state of the data, but the whole historical evolution [...]

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