Feed on
Posts
Comments

Tag Archive 'GPS'

Self-reporting is a well-established approach within the medical and psychological sciences. In order to avoid recall bias, i.e. past events being remembered inaccurately, the reports can be filled out on a smartphone in real-time and in the natural environment. This is often referred to as ambulatory assessment and the reports are usually triggered at [...]

Read Full Post »

When producing optimal routes through an environment, considering the incline of surfaces can be of great benefit in a number of use cases. For instance, incline may be considered when computing the most energy-efficient routes for electric cars and bicycles. Likewise, pedestrians with restricted mobility (such as wheelchair users, parents with pushchairs, and the elderly) [...]

Read Full Post »

We are happy to announce that a new JAVA-based tool is available that allows extracting raw GPS data from the OpenStreetMap GPS planet file. The tool is under LGPL license. It allows to specify a bounding box and to export the extracted data to 3D-Shapefiles. Besides the full GPS planet file there are also regional [...]

Read Full Post »

As can be seen in the WebGL visualisation of the GPS data collected by the OSM contributors in Heidelberg (reported earlier in this blog), the quantity of recorded GPS tracks along an OSM highway features depends on the feature class. It has already been found before that the GPS data is not equally distributed among [...]

Read Full Post »

GPS data uploaded to the OpenStreetMap servers is a popular example of what is called Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI). The data has been (and is still) collected by the project contributors primarily to support mapping. As the inclusion of roads and paths in the map is a major goal of the project, [...]

Read Full Post »

As a task for CAP4Access project, on Monday 11th of August, members of the Smart Simulation group (Mohamed Bakillah, Amin Mobasheri and Sarah Labusga) of GIScience at Heidelberg University performed a field experiment together with people with limited mobilities.
Several GPS trackers (with different characteristics and predefined parameters for data collection) were installed on three wheelchairs and for a selected route [...]

Read Full Post »

Talk within the Colloquium GIScience on
An Attempt to Use InSAR Methods to Detect Vertical Movements in Arctic Permafrost Regions
by Inga May, Alfred-Wegener Institute (AWI) Potsdam

Wednesday, 23.07.2014, 11:15-12:00h, Hörsaal Geogr. Institut, Berliner Str. 48
As permafrost is a subsurface phenomenon, and not directly visible from space, surface features, representing the permafrost situation underneath, have to be identified. [...]

Read Full Post »