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Tag Archive 'HOT'

In 2020, the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) received funding from seven donors through TED’s Audacious Project. This has accelerated HOT’s ambition to map an area home to one billion people. HOT is working to add places at high risk of natural disaster or experiencing poverty to OpenStreetMap by significantly scaling-up support for local mapping communities. [...]

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OpenStreetMap (OSM) offers many possibilities and holds potential in the area of freely available infrastructure data for the health sector. Nevertheless, it is important to underline that the quality of the information is different in each country, since the mapping activity is strongly affected by the size of the community of volunteers.
Monetary barriers prevent the [...]

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On December 8th at 6.30 pm the next international mapathon organized by the disastermappers heidelberg takes place! This time we map together with MAMAPA, an integration project for migrants and refugees from Mannheim, CartONG, LECLARA Larabanga and OSM Ghana.
We will map HOT-Tasks 8839 and 9928, the former including the city of Wa in northwestern Ghana, [...]

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Next week the HOT Summit will take place. The conference takes already place for the sixth time and it is the fifth consecutive time that we from HeiGIT/GIScience Heidelberg do contribute a session. This years topic is 10 Years of Humanitarian OpenStreetMap: The Past, Present, and Future of Humanitarian Mapping. It will be a one day [...]

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“Local Knowledge” is constituting the exceptional value of Volunteered Geographical Information and thus also considered as an important indicator of data quality. We are interested in how much local information is captured in OpenStreetMap data. In this blog post we explore the temporal evolution of mapping in OSM and the information [...]

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The project “25 Mapathons” made an important step forward by successfully completing the first four Mapathons of the project. Two Mapathons were conducted with German Red Cross (GRC) members from the Red Cross Regional association of Westfalen-Lippe. Another two Mapathons where hosted by local GRC chapters from the City of Heidelberg and the nearby town [...]

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Since 2010 organized humanitarian mapping has evolved as a constant and growing element of the global OpenStreetMap (OSM) community. With more than 7,000 projects in 150 countries humanitarian mapping has become a global community effort. Mappers have added more than 60 Million buildings to OSM through HOT’s Tasking Manager. That’s around 13% of all OSM [...]

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This week, at the prestigious GSMA MWC series (formally known as Mobile World Congress) MapSwipe was awarded the top prize in the Global Mobile Awards’ category for the Best Mobile Innovation Supporting Emergency or Humanitarian Situations. The award recognizes how mobile connectivity can provide a lifeline in major humanitarian disasters, providing access to critical information and [...]

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GIScience HD/HeiGIT sind seit geraumer Zeit Partner des Humanitarian Open StreetMap Team (HOT) und arbeiten an gemeinsamen Projekten zur Verbesserung von Geoinformationstechnologien und der Verfügbarkeit von Geodaten (insb. OpenStreetMap) für humanitäre Einsätze, insbesondere im globalen Süden, z.B. über die Missing Maps Initiative.
Im Rahmen der Veranstaltung Geographie in verschiedenen Berufsfeldern des Geographischen Instituts berichtet Marcel Reinmuth aus dem [...]

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im Rahmen der Geography Awareness Week laden die Geographie-Fachschaften der Standorte Göttingen, Hannover, Würzburg und Heidelberg und die disastermappers heidelberg herzlich zum standortübergreifenden Mapathon ein!
An diesem Mapathon werden wir gemeinschaftlich mit Hilfe von OpenStreetMap und fernerkundlichen Methoden neue Kartendaten für vernachlässigte Krisenregionen erstellen und somit humanitäre Hilfsorganisationen in ihrer Arbeit unterstützen. Welches Gebiet genau kartiert [...]

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